Posts Tagged - team

Retrospective: Setting Expectations

Setup

For this retrospective you’ll need sharpies, post-it notes and a wall, window or whiteboard on which they can be stuck.

Setting Expectations

At the heart of this retrospective exercise is defining expectations for yourself and your teammates. Start by explaining that on most teams, there are varying expectations. Some people expect different things from different people and from different roles. The exercise as described below is focused on a Scrum team, but the questions could be adapted for any team.

Ask the team to describe their expectations of the Scrum Master

  1. Be clear that these are not personal expectations of the particular team member who is currently in that role, but the expectations you would have of any Scrum Master on your team.
  2. Ask the participants to write down 3 to 5 ideas, each on separate notes, that describe what they expect of the Scrum Master. (Adjust the minimums and maximums for your group)
  3. Have the participants put their stickies on the wall or board in one big group

Repeat this process for the Product Owner role and the Development Team

Group Ideas

Now that some ideas have been generated, move the participants towards gaining insight by grouping them in like categories.

  1. Using Mute Mapping, have the participants group the stickies, while keeping them in their Scrum Master, Product Owner and Development Team boxes.
  2. With the help of the participants, name each grouping.

Generate Insights, Investigate Assumptions and Practice Empathy

Move through each role and explore the ideas generated by the team. Share that you hope to create a working agreement after discussing these ideas. Some questions might include:

  • Ask someone who is in a different role what might make it difficult for the Scrum Master (or Product Owner or Development Team) to live up to the expectations on the board.
  • Ask if anyone might change their behavior based on what they now know other people expect of them
  • Ask the participants if the expectations listed for a role seem too easy, too hard or just right
  • Ask if anyone is surprised by anything or if there is an expectation that they think is unrealistic
  • Ask if anyone feels strongly about a certain expectation

Create a Working Agreement

Now that the team has a more clear picture of expectations and they have thought about the difficulties of other people in other roles, work with the team to generate a working agreement. Some possibilities include:

  • No Excuses – We refuse to accept excuses when things go wrong
  • Be Brave – We will declare our intent when communicating by declaring “I’m going to be brave…”
  • Core Hours – Everyone will be physically present in the team room for at least 6 hours between 9AM and 5PM

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Agile Principles: Tear Down These Cubes

The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation.

– Agile Principles

Manager, Tear Down These Walls

If you were tasked with designing a system that made spontaneous collaboration difficult, you couldn’t go wrong with the modern cube farm. Members of a “team” dispersed over an area of the office, isolated in their drab tchotchke ridden cubicles. Instant message, e-mail and chat might be great for passive communication, but when it comes to real collaboration, being physically present is essential.

But We’re Distributed!

Co-located teams are better than distributed teams. However, sometimes we cannot be co-located. That does not mean we resort to passive forms of communication and digital tools to convey our progress and ask questions. Skype is better than a phone call which is better than e-mail. Don’t underestimate your brain’s ability to gather important insight from the facial and body language of the person on the other end of that video chat.

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Agile Principles: Self-Organizing Teams are Motivated Teams

Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done.

– Agile Principles

Self-Organizing

Allow the people doing the work to self-organize and discover the best implementation they can given what they know right now. Protect them from organizational politics and outside distractions, enable them to focus on the work at hand.

Self-Directing

While we encourage self-organization, we remember the need for direction. While the team does not self-direct, they need a clear vision and an understanding of success in order to attain the autonomy and purpose required to feel motivated.

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Agile Principles: Collaborate Everyday

Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project.

– Agile Principles

Email is not Enough

Working together involves more than exchanging e-mails about the software. It’s more than passive instant messenger conversations. It’s not reviewing a digital agile tool in isolation. Working together means collaborating, negotiating and exploring the software that is being built.

Too Busy for Success?

If you’re too busy to interact, fairly frequently, on a daily basis with the rest of the team, you’re too busy to enable product success. High performance teams don’t allow their schedules to be overrun by meetings. They don’t let anything get in the way of daily collaboration, negotiating and exploration.

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