Retrospective: Setting Expectations

Setup

For this retrospective you’ll need sharpies, post-it notes and a wall, window or whiteboard on which they can be stuck.

Setting Expectations

At the heart of this retrospective exercise is defining expectations for yourself and your teammates. Start by explaining that on most teams, there are varying expectations. Some people expect different things from different people and from different roles. The exercise as described below is focused on a Scrum team, but the questions could be adapted for any team.

Ask the team to describe their expectations of the Scrum Master

  1. Be clear that these are not personal expectations of the particular team member who is currently in that role, but the expectations you would have of any Scrum Master on your team.
  2. Ask the participants to write down 3 to 5 ideas, each on separate notes, that describe what they expect of the Scrum Master. (Adjust the minimums and maximums for your group)
  3. Have the participants put their stickies on the wall or board in one big group

Repeat this process for the Product Owner role and the Development Team

Group Ideas

Now that some ideas have been generated, move the participants towards gaining insight by grouping them in like categories.

  1. Using Mute Mapping, have the participants group the stickies, while keeping them in their Scrum Master, Product Owner and Development Team boxes.
  2. With the help of the participants, name each grouping.

Generate Insights, Investigate Assumptions and Practice Empathy

Move through each role and explore the ideas generated by the team. Share that you hope to create a working agreement after discussing these ideas. Some questions might include:

  • Ask someone who is in a different role what might make it difficult for the Scrum Master (or Product Owner or Development Team) to live up to the expectations on the board.
  • Ask if anyone might change their behavior based on what they now know other people expect of them
  • Ask the participants if the expectations listed for a role seem too easy, too hard or just right
  • Ask if anyone is surprised by anything or if there is an expectation that they think is unrealistic
  • Ask if anyone feels strongly about a certain expectation

Create a Working Agreement

Now that the team has a more clear picture of expectations and they have thought about the difficulties of other people in other roles, work with the team to generate a working agreement. Some possibilities include:

  • No Excuses – We refuse to accept excuses when things go wrong
  • Be Brave – We will declare our intent when communicating by declaring “I’m going to be brave…”
  • Core Hours – Everyone will be physically present in the team room for at least 6 hours between 9AM and 5PM
Clayton Lengel-Zigich avatar
About Clayton Lengel-Zigich
Clayton Lengel-Zigich is an agile team leader, speaker and software developer in Scottsdale, Arizona.